Help promote Talking Matters this International Literacy Day

Talking MattersSupporting parents to help their kids learn is the key to getting more children reading successfully and getting the best start in education.

Oral language is the foundation for literacy, so we’re using International Literacy Day – Tuesday 8 September – to promote the importance of talking, singing, storytelling and reading to children.

Before we can read and write, we have to speak, listen and understand, so children need to be exposed to an abundance of language in their everyday lives.

A great way to grow children’s brains is through conversational turns – where the conversation goes back and forth between the adult and child at least five times (this is more than asking them questions).

Here are seven things you can do to support literacy and oracy on International Literacy Day:

  • Dedicate the day to storytelling – invite a couple of parents to tell stories about their lives, or to tell the legends of their families and cultures
  • Read aloud – read to your own kids or have them read to you or each other. Have every class read at the same time
  • Create a random act of reading – grab a pile of books and take your children to read in the public such as the park, a café, or even on the footpath
  • Spread the word – tell parents a couple of simple, free and easy ways to help grow their children’s brain by talking, singing and reading to them. One great idea is to make a collaborative digital book with your children
  • Have a book swap next week – bring in books from home, ask other parents to do the same, and have a book swap
  • With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, ask all the Dads or father-figures you know to read to their children, and post a photo of it on social media
  • Spread the word to your staff at work by having a short training session about the importance of oral language and consider how as an employer you might help improve literacy for your own staff

Keep up with us online

We will be posting facts, stats and updates about International Literacy Day and Talking Matters on Twitter – you can follow us here.

If you’re on Twitter, use #TalkingMatters in your tweets to help get our message across.

If you want to know more information about Talking Matters click here, or check out the links below for some recent interviews and articles on oracy and literacy:

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LEARNING AUCKLAND: FOCUS ON ORACY

The Learning Auckland Leadership Table met for the second time on February 26. The Table endorsed continuing membership in Strive Together, the network of 53 cities in the USA working to create effective ‘cradle to career’ education and skills pathways for all young people.  Membership of Strive enables Learning Auckland to draw on experienced collective impact initiatives focused on education change.

Table members reported back on ‘100 conversations in 100 days’, conversations each of them had with families, young people, educators and community leaders about what people believed to be the urgent issues for Auckland to address.

There were some powerful conversations that showed the lack of coherence in parts of system, and the enthusiasm and passion many people have for ensuring all young people succeed.  Over the next few months, we will use those conversations as the springboard for action.

On the basis of these conversations, plus the data and their own knowledge and experience, the Leadership Table identified early oral language (oracy) and school readiness as their first focus area for action towards Learning Auckland’s wider goals.

Early oral language underpins success in literacy – and oral communication is a fundamental life skill.  A focus on oracy and school readiness brings together families, early learning, health, child development, family-facing services and parent education.

Over the next few months we will be bringing together a cross-sector action group to plan and drive a systems response to support early oral language development for Auckland’s children and their families.

To learn more about Learning Auckland or the oracy work, please contact Alison Sutton Alison.Sutton@cometauckland.org.nz

For the full March 2015 newsletter, please click here.

SUPPORTING ORACY FOR SCHOOL READINESS

OracyOral language underpins education, employment and relationship success across the lifespan. Early learning, parent education, child health and family wellbeing services all have a role to play in making sure our children have the oracy they need. Yet we don’t often talk about the importance of talking. In early November, COMET Auckland hosted a workshop to discuss the oracy and school readiness in our communities.  Strong relationships in the home are the basis to strong literacy and oracy development – reinforcing the wrap around function of parenting.

In early November, COMET Auckland, with the support of the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education, hosted a workshop to discuss oracy and school readiness. There was great interest, with 36 people from 19 organisations attending. The need to grow a cross-sector understanding of oracy was a key discussion point along with professional development for educators and finding ways to support families to use their home languages. Another meeting is planned for early next year. If you are interested in being involved, please contact Alison Sutton at Alison.Sutton@cometauckland.org.nz

For the full November newsletter, please click here.